Immigrant Ancestors to America
ImmigrantDescription
Peter RuckerHe immigrated from England in the Colony of Virginia circa 1700. Various unproven stories exist concerning the origin of Peter Rucker in America, most involving him surviving the sinking of a ship. R. A. Brock’s, Huguenot Emigration to Virginia and Settlement at Manakin-Town, Richmond, VA, 1886, p.49-50 had the following: “At a Council held at the hon’ble Mr. Auditor Byrd’s 14th day of Nov. 1700,” there is an accounting of the events of that year including: “ . . . carryed [sic] up to Monocantown [sic] about 120 [French Protestant] refugees, of whom six are dead and about 20 gone away, some from libertinage and lazinesse [sic] and some for want of bread . . . Besides ye loss they suffered at James Town by ye sinking of their sloop, where they had their goods lost and spoiled to yea value of 300 pounds, and ye sicknesse [sic] they have laid under at ye falls [now Richmond] these four months . . .” Peter was naturalized in 1704, and the current law required immigrants to live in the country at least 4 years before they could be naturalized, so Peter would have arrive in 1700 or earlier. The most probable theory is that he was on the sloop that sunk in Jamestown in 1700.
Revolutionary War Patriots
PatriotDescription of Service
John P. CampbellHe of Amherst County, Virginia, aided the American revolution in 1781 by served as a private in the Revolutionary War for seven months.
Thomas CoppedgeHe of Northumberland County, Virginia, aided the American revolution from 1776 to 1778 by serving as a private in the Army under Captain Thomas Gaskins.
Archelaus MitchellHe of Amherst County, Virginia, aided the American revolution from 1776 to 1780 by serving as a private and a sargeant in the Revolutionary War.
Jesse ReynoldsHe of Bedford County, Virginia, aided the American revolution from 1776 to 1778 by serving as a sergeant in the Army under Captain Gross Scruggs.
Capt. David WoodroofHe of Amherst County, Virginia, aided the American revolution in 1779 by commanding a company of militia.
War of 1812 Veterans
VeteranDescription of Service
Joseph FuquaHe enlisted at Liberty, Bedford County, Virginia and served as a private in Captain John P. Gray's company of Virginia militia from 1 Sep 1814 to 14 Sep 1814.
John GlassHe served in the War of 1812 as a private in Capt. Abram Bufords' Company of the 8th Regiment of Virginia Militia from 5 Sep 1814 to 19 Feb 1815. He was a substitute for John Cauthorn.
Civil War Veterans
VeteranDescription of Service
William AshleyHe served as a private in Company I (the Amherst Rifle Grays) of the 19th Virginia Infantry between 20 May 1861 and 9 Apr 1865. This company took part in the battles of Williamsburg, Seven Pines, Gaines Mill, and Malvern Hill between May and June of 1862. He took a furlough for 15 days in March of 1863. Beginning around June of 1863 he was detailed to special duty as a teamster driving one of the brigade staff wagons. The 19th Virginia Infantry was part of Garnett's Brigade at Gettysburg and were deployed at the center of the brigade during Pickett's famous charge on July 3rd. It isn't known if Private William Ashley took part in the charge. He remained as a teamster for the brigade command through the end of 1864, including at the Battle of Cold Harbor and spending a lot of time at Chaffin's Farm east of Richmond. No record exists for Private Ashley after 1864 but he probably stayed with the 19th Virginia until their capture at Sayler's Creek on April 6th, 1865.
David S. CampbellHe served in the Confederate Army as a private in Captain J. Henry Rives' Company of the Nelson Light Artillery from Aug 1861 to Feb 1865. He enlisted in Nelson County on 1 Aug 1861 for the duration of the war. He was reported as being sick in the field hospital at the end of 1864 and was given a 60 day furlough on January 11, 1865 by the medical examining board because he was incapable of performing his duties. He was suffering from anasarca, also known as "extreme generalized edema", a medical condition characterised by widespread swelling of the skin due to effusion of fluid into the extracellular space. There are no records that indicate that he ever returned to duty.
Corbin Decator GlassHe enlisted on the Confederate side as a private in Patterson's Company (Campbell Battery) of Virginia Heavy Artillery on 5 Mar 1862. This unit was disbanded on 5 Jul 1862 and the men assigned to Company D of the 18th Heavy Artillery Battalion. He was listed as absent without leave from Co. D since 7 Jul 1862 and it is not known if he ever reported.
Edward M. GlassHe served on the Confederate side as a private in Co. D of the 18th Virginia Heavy Artillery from 5 Mar 1862 to 24 Sep 1862. He was discharged on 24 Sep 1862 for unknown reasons.
Jesse Chiswell GlassHe enlisted on the Confederate side as a private in Patterson's Company (Campbell Battery) of Virginia Heavy Artillery on 5 Mar 1862. This unit was disbanded on 5 Jul 1862 and the men assigned to Company D of the 18th Heavy Artillery Battalion. He was listed as absent without leave from Co. D since 7 Jul 1862 and it is not known if he ever reported.
Thomas W. GlassHe was a private in Company I of Col. R. T. W. Duke's Regiment of the 2nd Virginia Reserves in Apr 1865 in Richmond, Virginia. He was captured in hospital at Richmond on 3 Apr 1865, admitted to Jackson Hospital in Richmond on 9 Apr 1865, and turned over to the Provost Marshall on 14 Apr 1865.
Bowling Louis MitchellHe enlisted as a private in Capt. Kirkpatrick's Company of the Virginia Light Artillery for the duration of the war on 14 Jan 1863 in Caroline County, Virginia.
He was captured at the Battle of Fisher's Hill on 22 Sep 1864 in Strasburg, Shenandoah County, Virginia. He was imprisoned at Point Lookout, Maryland and paroled 17 Mar 1865 to Aiken's Landing near Richmond, Virginia in an exchange of prisoners.
He appears on roll of paroled and exchanged prisoners on 20 Mar 1865 in Camp Lee, Richmond, Virginia.
Sylvester MitchellHe served on the Confederate side as a Lieutenant in Company I of the 25th Virginia Infantry Regiment, part of Early's Brigade in 1862. He was severly wounded in the thigh on 28 Aug 1862 during the 2nd Battle of Manassas and reported as killed on 29 Aug 1862.
George Sallings MorrisHe served on the Confederate side as a private in Capt. Kirkpatrick's Company of Light Artillery (Amherst Artillery) from 11 Sep 1861 to Oct 1864. He enlisted in Richmond on 11 Sep 1861 and served the duration of the war.
Legrand Ferdinand Cortez ReynoldsHe enlisted in Company H of the 4th Regiment of the Virginia Infantry as a Private on 10 Mar 1862 in Lexington, Albemarle County, Virginia. He developed a chronic leg ulcer and was detailed to light duty or hospital duty on 20 Aug 1864.
Obadiah B. Reynolds Jr.He served on the Confederate side as a private in Company E of the 27th Virginia Infantry from Nov 1862 to 17 Jun 1865. He served primarliy as a teamster or wagon master and was captured at Gettysburg on 3 Jul 1863 and held in the prison camp at Fort Delaware, Delaware until he was exchanged at City Point on 31 Jul 1863. Following his release he returned to his duty as a teamster and was captured again near Petersburg, VA on 25 Mar 1865. He was released 17 Jun 1865 after taking the oath of allegiance at Port Lookout, Maryland.
Addison Morgan WhiteHe was discharged from Co. E of the 11th Virginia Infantry on 7 May 1862. The militia unit was organized by faculty and students at Lynchburg College in May, 1861, and accepted into Confederate service in July. It became Company E, 11th Virginia Infantry in the Confederate army. The commanding officer of the company, Captain James E. Blankenship, was a mathematics professor at Lynchburg College. Though Blankenship had graduated at the top of his class at the Virginia Military Institute in 1852, his nerve failed when tested in battle. During the First Battle of Manassas he fled in the middle of the fighting. It was reorganized on 26 April 1862.
John William WhiteHe served on the Confederate side as a private in Company B of the 8th Virginia Cavalry from 20 Jul 1861 to 4 Jun 1862. He enlisted at Wytheville, VA on 20 Jul 1861 for 1 year. He was medically discharged on 4 Jun 1862 due to frequent hemorages from his lungs.
World War I Veterans
VeteranDescription of Service
John Edward WhiteHe served in the Army in 1918.
 

DISCLAIMER

Although every effort has been made to verify the accuracy of the information provided on this website, you should not assume that it is 100% correct. Use what you find as a starting point for your own research, and verify all your sources. If you find any errors, please contact me and provide me with the source of the correct information. Thank you and I hope you enjoy this site.